The Best Chest Freezer to Own in 2018

Chest Freezer with items

If you have a large family, grocery shop in bulk, or do a lot of fishing and hunting, a chest freezer can be a great purchase. According to the United States Department of Agriculture people in America waster over 150 billion dollars by throwing away food each year.

Better yet, owning a chest freezer can be a great way to prevent waste and add savings to your monthly grocery budget. It is one of those purchases that you will make and then ask yourself,"Where have you been all my life?!"

What Is A Chest Freezer?

The most economical (and most popular) type of freezer is a chest freezer. The chest freezer got its name because it is shaped like a large treasure chest and has a lid that opens upwards instead of out like a fridge.

You can find chest freezers in a variety of sizes. They are typically anywhere from 2.1 cubic feet up to 40 cubic feet. People usually don't keep these freezers in the kitchen because of their size. Instead, they are typically found in the utility room, garage, or basement.

Chest freezers differ from upright, draw, and portable freezers in many ways. Besides the size, the biggest difference is that they don't have a fan and it can cause some problems. Since there is no air circulation, the temperatures can be inconsistent inside of the freezer.

Chest freezer

That will not hurt your food and can actually help prevent freezer burn. It is recommended that you store meats and large items at the bottom of the freezer as this will always be the coldest part.

Storing smaller items like bags of food, precooked meals, and frozen vegetables at the top make it easier for them to stay frozen and also makes it easier to access them.

Why Do I Need One?

A chest freezer can be very affordable and help save you tons of money. Do you have a garden? Even a small garden can produce large amounts of fruits and vegetables. While giving away the extra to friends and family is nice, think about how great it would be to have such a nice bounty for your own family during the winter months.

Freezing fruits and veggies also gives you time to plan what you want to do with your food. Making 35 cans of strawberry jam might seem like a great idea in the summer, but after the 10th jar, it will probably be the last thing you want to eat.

Owning a chest freezer is also great for buying meat in bulk or if you or someone you know is a hunter. Meat is one of the most expensive items on a family's grocery list.

Imagine if you could get meat in bulk and save money at the same time. Not only can it help your budget, but it can also cut down on the amount of time you spend grocery shopping each week.

Saving time is another great reason why you need a chest freezer. Not only will you save time by grocery shopping less, but you can also save time by precooking meals. A quick Google search will supply you with hundreds, if not thousands of recipes that are family friendly and freeze well.

Cooking ahead isn't just for meals, but works great for baking as well. You can make your own premade pie crust as well as muffins, bread, and cookies. Spending on weekend cooking can make the rest of your meals for the month much easier to prepare and serve.

How We Compiled Our Reviews

  • Hours and hours into researching each chest freezer we will be reviewing in this article.
  • We scoured sites such as Amazon, BestBuy, and Home Depot to make sure we get a wide range of unbiased reviews.
  • We are not affiliated with any of the companies listed in this article and receive no incentive to give them good or bad recommendations.

Prices of Chest Freezers

The great thing about chest freezers is their affordability, not only for the initial purchase but for running them as well. You can check out online for the latest price of a new chest freezer and pick those that are within your budget.

Size is the most significant factor in pricing, but things like baskets and organization ability play a factor as well.

Because chest freezers can be purchased at such low prices, there is generally more concern given to how much it will cost to run year round. Being nervous about adding another appliance to the electric bill is a valid concern, but not one you need to have when it comes to owning a chest freezer.

On average it will cost you $25 to $52 a year to run a chest freezer. The size of the freezer you choose will play a big factor in exactly how much it will cost, as well as how much food you keep in your freezer.

A fully stocked chest freezer uses less electricity than a half-empty one. Chances are you will be able to save much more in a year on your food budget than what you'll spend on power.

Our Top Eight Chest Freezer Choices

The choices below are in no particular order. When trying to figure out what size freezer is right for your family, it is important to remember that a 3.5 cubic foot freezer will hold about 123 pounds of frozen food.

A 5.0 cubic foot freezer will hold approximately 175 pounds of frozen food, and 7.0 cubic foot freezer will hold around 245 pounds of food.

Since the more full your freezer is, the less it costs to run, it is essential to get a freezer that is the right size for your family.

Avanti CF6216E

Midea WHS129C1

Amana AQC0501GRW

Danby DCF038A1WDB13

Frigidaire FFFC15M4TW

Haier HF50CM23NW

Insignia NSCZ50WH6

RCA FRF450-B

Which Chest Freezer Is The Best?

Each chest freezer on our list can be a great option depending on your needs and budget. It is important to consider the little additions, like castors and drains, which might not seem like a big deal when purchasing the freezer at first but will become important later on.

Also, keep in mind that you don't want to buy a freezer that is too large. Not keeping your freezer full will mean you're paying more in electric each month to keep it running.

If you shop smart and are realistic about what you need then owning a chest freezer can be a great time and money saver for you and your family. Who doesn't need a little bit more of both?

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